A night sky filled with stars is above a forest and pathway covered in snow.

God’s order is not our own, and the upside-down Kingdom is often led by those whom we might prefer to ignore or condemn. “Teacher, rebuke your disciples!” the Pharisees demand. I tell you,” he replied, “if they keep quiet, the stones will cry out.” Pay close enough attention, he instructs, and if we’re quiet we will hear even the voice of these silent rocks. Read More →

…we meet countless parents and family members who are battle-worn from advocating for equality and support for their children with disabilities. These parents can be fierce, because they need to be! They are forced to advocate/argue/fight against systems and societal forces that actively discriminate against their children. Too often, they face these same barriers and oppressive attitudes in churches, synagogues, and faith communities that claim to care for all God’s children. Read More →

Two young adults sit on couches and look off in the distance. The photo is in black and white. Abby is in the foreground. She has long curly hair. Logan is in the background. He has short hair and looks very relaxed.

While the incarnation is a unique event in Christian theology, the experience of embodiment is not. I have found the image of the Word made flesh to be a powerful paradigm for seeing the experience of my minimally verbal children, both in their relationships with me and their expression of faith. Read More →

A hand holds up a film clapper for The Chosen Season 2 in front of actors in costume playing little James and Matthew.

One of the reasons I am especially grateful to writers and producers of The Chosen series is for their faithful portrayals of various Bible characters with different disabilities throughout the series, and for their insight into how some of Jesus’ disciples might have very well been people with disabilities. In so doing they show that people with disabilities do not need to be cured in order to follow Jesus or to serve him well. Read More →

This is an image of the cover of the book Whole Community by David Morstad. There is a photo of a young woman with Down Syndrome holding a coffee cup. She has light brown hair and is looking into the distance.

Ultimately, though, the way forward […] will be navigated in relationship with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities themselves. As Whole Community makes clear, it is people with lived experience who are experts on the best way forward. “The most powerful and effective act that people without disabilities can take is to yield to the voice of people with disabilities” Read More →